Object Detail


Artist
Date
1952
Period
20th century
Media
Oil with charcoal under drawing on canvas
Measurements
42 x 31 1/2 inches (sight)
48 1/2 x 38 1/2 x 2 1/16 inches (framed)
Classification
Subject Category
Figure
Credit Line
Gift of Mary Louise Meyer in memory of Norman Meyer, 1997.6
Accession No
97.6
Context
Milton Avery’s work, done shortly after Jackson Pollock’s meteoric rise to prominence, reflects his by then decades-long grounding in the modernist tradition exemplified by the work of Georgia O’Keeffe, Marsden Hartley, and Arthur Dove. Like his modernist contemporaries, Avery never completely abandoned representational imagery. In this work showing a typist at work, he depicts the figure, the black typewriter and sheet of white paper, and the surrounding room in the simplest of terms, with large planes of relatively unmodulated color. The form-defining outlines found in his earlier work have disappeared, and he allows the edges of one form to bleed into another. As Avery wrote in 1951, the year before he finished this work: "I try to construct a picture in which shapes, spaces, colors, form a set of unique relationships, independent of any subject matter".

Featured in “Maine and American Art: Farnsworth Art Museum” with thanks to the Henry Luce Foundation and Wyeth Foundation for American Art.

Classification

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